Learning with Athelstan Museum

Athelstan Museum is a great resource to learn about Malmesbury and the surrounding areas connection to history. If you are interested in any of the following please contact Janet at info@athelstanmuseum.org.uk who can co-ordinate accordingly.

School Visits

These can be tailor made in discussion with teachers to suit the age group/number of children visiting, may include quizzes, activities (dressing up, games, handling artifacts, discussion with volunteers) within the museum and/or walks around the town in small groups looking at particular or general points of interest and linking with photographic or artifactual evidence within the museum. There is sometimes the opportunity for children to learn the basics of bobbin lace making during school visits. Download the School Brochure.

Family Days

Activities for children and carers to take part in together, usually linked to a topical theme from within the museum display (eg making model trains when transport display was set up or like the upcoming diamond jubillee - making commemorative plates and 'diamond brooches'. Lacemaking is a regular - all family fun days take place during school holidays. See our Whats On page for details.

Outreach Visits

These can made to groups of adults and/or children in schools and will be themed around a particular subject (currently able to offer Vikings - general and Malmesbury, Carnival in Malmesbury, Toys/ childhood memories, general, 2nd World war and the 1950's general and Malmesbury).

Group Visits to Athelstan Museum

These can be tailor made to groups requirements (in a similiar way to schools) - groups who have visited in the past have included - Brownies, Cubs, UA3, Nadfas, Residential care homes for older peopleand students on exchange visits.

Library

A small selection of local history publications for use in the museum.

Publications

We have a series of small booklets about Malmesbury history (including Athelstan, Eilmer, Clock and watch makers, Civil war).

Images

Although these are on the BBC website, the pictures originated from Athelstan Museum's collection.